3 min read

N.98 / Just another Monday.

THIS WEEK → Marginalia ⊗ Swimming Sculptures ⊗ Intimate Facebook ⊗ Social Death.
N.98 / Just another Monday.

It is indeed Monday (again).
You made it? Give yourself a high five.
Here are some interesting internet things to click on:

Sammy


What sort of hotel is this?

HELLO, I’m Sammy Haywood and you’ve signed up for the Making Hay: Whilst The Sun Still Shines a weekly newsletter, which primarily features a curious, creative, and considered look at the world in internet form.

Below you’ll find an instalment of the newsletter, which contains a variety of items, some of them with a bit of additional commentary from me, and a closing note.

As always there is a one click unsubscribe at the bottom.

Read on. Share promiscuously.


Cool Tools

Marginalia

Find what you didn't know you were looking for

I love the serendipitous search results I get when using Marginalia. It is not equipped to answer questions and suggests that you “instead try to imagine some text that might appear in the website you are looking for, and search for that.” SEO-optimized sites are down-ranked and text-heavy sites are favoured. It’s given me such a larger window to the internet and I hope it never goes away. (View).


Explore The Curiosity

A Striking Photo Series Documents the Melting Glaciers Along 4,000 Kilometers of Greenland’s Coast

Grace Ebert| Youtube | 25th October 2021

Since 2003, photographer Olaf Otto Becker has been documenting the decline of the glaciers and ice sheet in Greenland. Regularly, like the ticking of a clock, huge, new icebergs from the edges of the glacier plunge into the ocean each day with a thunderous boom and a roar. Our planet breathes. The accelerated melting of the ice is nothing more than one of our Earth’s compensatory reactions (Look).

‘The Problem Is Him’

James D. Walsh | NY Mag | 27th October 2021

“Apparently, he has dinners. He reads a lot. He apparently calls famous people. One year, he’ll decide to learn everything he can about killing animals. It’s very earnest and poignant in a weird way, trying all kinds of different things to educate himself. He tried a podcast for a New York minute where he had discussions with smart people. He hasn’t posted in months and months. A lot of Silicon Valley people do that kind of bullshit. They style themselves as journalists or intellectuals, neither of which they are, but whatever. He’s tried all manner of things to try to educate himself.”

Kara Swisher offers an intimate take on the rolling moments of crisis for the man that built Meta (Read).

Documenting Her Wife’s Death on Social Media.

The New Yorker | Youtube | 23rd June 2021

After Kathy Brandt was diagnosed with late-stage ovarian cancer, she and her wife Kim Acquaviva, both of whom worked in end-of-life care, started documenting the end of her life on social media. The result was a frank portrait of death, which offered non-medical folks a view of something they rarely get to witness  (Watch).


The Contemplation Station

Perhaps one did not want to be loved so much as to be understood.
– George Orwell


Thanks for your time, energy and presence in making it all the way to the bottom.

Spelling mistakes, glaring omissions, furious rants or grudging tips of the hat, I welcome it all.

Till next time,

Thanks,
Sammy

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Making Hay: Whilst The Sun Shines
A optimistic newsletter helping you to get curious and think critically each Monday.

The office is located in East Melbourne, Victoria, the traditional lands of the Wurundjeri people. I acknowledge that the culture showcased here owes the roots of its theory and practice to traditional and Indigenous knowledges, from all over the world.

We all stand on the shoulders of many ancestors – as we learn, and re-learn, these skills and concepts. We pay our deepest respects and give our heartfelt thanks to these knowledge-keepers, both past, present and projected.⁠

To offset the carbon emissions of this newsletter, I plant one native Australian tree for every issue. I encourage you to do the same in your country.